What to see in Rome – the eternal city

 

We spent a week in Rome, half of it visiting the Vatican and the museums there. However, that’s not all what Rome is about, so we decided to take a stroll around the city and see Rome’s culture and history.

The Colosseum

Of course, top historical site on the list was the Colosseum, located on Piazza del Colosseo. An ancient Gladiator battle ground, Colloseum was impressive from afar and absolutely stunning close by. Everyone has seen pictures of it online, but to see it in person was a memorable experience. We did not get inside as the queues were enourmous. My advice is to get your ticket online – this is one of the options. This way you can skip the queues and enter the grounds of the battle arena.

Colloseum

The view from the street to the Colloseum

 

The Pantheon

Another popular sight in Rome is the Pantheon, located on Piazza della Rotonda. It has a very interesting history – it used to be an ancient Roman temple worshipping old Roman gods. Nowadays it’s a Catholic church. It also serves as a tomb for two Italian kings, several Renaissance artists, among them Raphael. The Pantheon is open for visitors during the day for free – anyone can enter and look around. There are benches as well and some people pray.

The Pantheon outside

When you get inside, your eyes automatically drift to the occulus above

 

Trevi Fountain

Located on Piazza di Trevi, the Trevi fountain is one of Rome’s most popular attractions and undoubtedly the most popular fountain in the world. I found it indeed impressive. However, you will be unpleasently surprised by how many people gather in front of the fountain. It’s almost impossible to get a closer look or throw a coin.

We had to walk to the fountain from the center of Rome and there were several signs pointing in the right direction, otherwise we ma nit have found it. It’s surtprising how small and ordinary, typically European the streets of Rome look, but they take you to amazing historical sites.

The Trevi Fountain

 

Il Vittoriano – the monument of Vittorio Emanuele II

On our way back from the Colosseum, we walked on the streets of Rome and somewhat accidentally found Il Vittoriano. This monument honors Vittorio Emanuele II, who was the firts kinf of unified Italy. The monument itself looks more like a castle than anything else and is located between Piazza Venezia and Capitoline Hill. The monument is made from white marble and stands out around the grey-ish surrounding buildings.

Il Vittoriano

Housing in Rome

When planning our trip to Rome, we noticed an interesting facts. In Rome, bed and breakfasts are much more popular and available than hotels. Not to mention, they are a lot more budget-friendly as well. After reviewing for a few days, we chose to stay in Romoletto. This is a small bed and breakfast establishment very near to the Vatican – around 20 min walk to St Peter’s basilica. The host speaks perfect English and they offer good breakfast and clean rooms. They cleaned our room every day and were friendly and helpful so this is definitely a place I would recommend!

Find out how we spent our time in the Vatican in Part I and Part II!

Why we think Rome is not overrated?

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